Explore the Gallagher resource library

At Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., we try to learn everything we can about the industries we serve and the risks they may encounter. It’s a commitment that’s embedded in our corporate culture to expanding our expertise, continuing educational development and gathering topical updates to remain ahead of the curve.

431 - 440 of 1895 items

An Employer's Guide to COBRA

An Employer's Guide to COBRA provides general information on COBRA. The Guide includes topics such as why COBRA, who must comply, what coverage must be offered, administration and recordkeeping procedures and how to determine and collect premiums. Each of the topic areas are accessed in easy to navigate sections and An Employer's Guide to COBRA also provides sample COBRA notices that customers can download and customize for their own use. Updated September 2018.

Tag(s): Health & Welfare; Compliance Consulting;

School Talk - Don’t Bother Me. I’m Embezzling.

The treasurer of the high school band booster club withdrew funds to pay for personal vacations. An accounts payable clerk has been siphoning off funds. The school janitor is using work supplies to clean houses on the side, and pocket the income. These people are all embezzlers.

2017 Atlantic Seasonal Hurricane Forecast

The official 2017 hurricane season began June 1st and will run until November 30th. The forecast for 2017 is believed to have average activity. is forecast is based on an extended-range early June statistical prediction scheme that was developed using 29 years of past data.

Tag(s): Claims Advocacy;

CompDoctor Article, August 2017 Edition

In this CompDoctor article, Jim Fox and Bruce Lawson answer the following question about the importance of using minimum requirements in job descriptions: We are completing a comprehensive job classification study and are in the process of drafting new job descriptions and class specifications for each job in the new structure. When we discuss the process with our department heads and employee representatives, we meet some resistance to the minimum qualifications we have proposed. The general reaction is that our minimum qualifications are too low, which leads to concerns that we will end up getting unqualified applicants. Employee comments are focused on the fact that they had to have higher qualifications when they were hired, and they want to know why we are dumbing down the requirements. Can you share some insights as to what the minimum qualifications are designed to do and why they are important?